It’s Really Only 43 Miles to Walhalla…

…but, on Saturday, we did it in 75 miles. This is what happens when you leave your house without any real destination in mind. “Oh, wait – that looks like an interesting road!” becomes your compass, and you end up in a spot where it looks like you’ll have to back up six miles.

Somewhere in Northwestern South Carolina

Somewhere in Northwestern South Carolina


Great Blue Heron along NC 107

Great Blue Heron

South of Cashiers, we stopped for a look at Silver Run Falls. There’s a short path from the tiny parking area to the bottom of the falls. In some of the photos I’ve seen of the falls, it has two distinct streams, but on Saturday, with a lot of meltwater draining into the river, there was one huge gush.

Silver Run Falls

Silver Run Falls


Part of the trail to Silver Run Falls

Part of the trail to Silver Run Falls

There’s a big fish hatchery north of Walhalla, South Carolina, and we stopped to have a look the trout.

A tall fence topped with barbed-wire protects the trouts from fish-nappers.

A tall fence topped with barbed-wire protects the trout from fish-nappers.


Avid fishermen Bob and Bella take a close look at this year's trout.

Avid fishermen Bob and Bella take a close look at this year’s trout.


Young trouts

Young trouts


Adult, grill-ready trout

Adult, grill-ready trout

We also stopped at Stumphouse Mountain Tunnel, a Blue Ridge Railway project that was abandoned in 1859 when the state of South Carolina refused to spend any more money on it. Issaqueena Waterfall is nearby, but it was mid-afternoon and the falls was crawling with tourists so I couldn’t get a photo of it.

Bob and Bella in Stumphouse Mountain Tunnel: "You go on ahead; I'll just sit here and wait for you."

Bob and Bella in Stumphouse Mountain Tunnel: “You go on ahead; I’ll just sit here and wait for you.”


The End.

The End.

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6 Comments

Filed under Department of Arts & Tourism, News & Events

6 responses to “It’s Really Only 43 Miles to Walhalla…

  1. Great post, Ann, and lovely photos. Today I had a geography lesson from your post – the Smokies are in south Carolina??? Geography was my worst subject at school and I sort of thought, in a vague way, that the Smokies were sort of north and sort of central in the US. So off I went to trusty Wikipedia and now know where the Smokies are situated – a very long way from where I thought they were!

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    • Ann

      Thank you, Mo! Yes, a tiny corner of SC does have mountains. I’ve learned so much more about places around the world reading blogs than I ever did in school. Blog posts give you a bit of geography, history, culture and even politics all rolled into one, and with my gtranslate FireFox addon, I don’t even have to stick to English blogs!

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  2. NICE. nice (w)ramble. we do that sort of thing, sum-times … (but with a lot less trout!)

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    • Ann

      Thank you! You may not have trouts, but you have antelopes (and no camera!) It was really painful. I’m looking into the water and all I could see was a plate with a pink trout steaming on a bed of wild rice. I really need to coax Bob and Bella over to the riverbank with their fishing poles.

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  3. This is a “wow post” to me. Very interesting story and so great photos.

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